Author Topic: query on arrival/transit marking  (Read 2432 times)

Marc Gonzales

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 156
    • View Profile
Re: query on arrival/transit marking
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2011, 02:28:38 PM »
Spuff,
This makes sense, clerks markings....  Thanks.
Marc

Martin "Spuff" Spufford

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 816
    • View Profile
Re: query on arrival/transit marking
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2011, 02:35:57 AM »
 :)
From this information I am now of the opinion that these "escutcheons" or "tombstones" are clerical identifyers.
 
The top line shows the time "5Ev5" or 5pm (evening) or conversely "10Fn10" or 10am (forenoon)
 The second line is the day and month , the third line is of course the year and the initial at the bottom probably identifies the person who handled the piece of mail in the sorting office(s) on its way to its final destination .
 
So they cannot probably be identified as the place in which they were struck.

Marc Gonzales

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 156
    • View Profile
Re: query on arrival/transit marking
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2011, 07:23:32 PM »
Spuff,
It is a town or local delivery marking, of which there are many and won't be found in general Maritime books.  You would have to search literature on British postmarks to locate it.  I call them tombstone cancels, attached are two examples on the same cover, one is "H" the other "E". 
Marc
« Last Edit: September 05, 2011, 09:52:08 PM by Marc Gonzales »

Martin "Spuff" Spufford

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 816
    • View Profile
query on arrival/transit marking
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2011, 08:40:27 PM »
 :)
I have not seen this one before. RED shield type cancel.
The ship  RMSP "Tweed" arrived at Southampton on 6th May and the letter travelled to London.
 
There is a standard arrival circular cancel but what is this one??
 
I have looked at all the illustrations in Heath and do not see it anywhere.