Author Topic: Maritime mail 1874  (Read 2624 times)

Bob Watson

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Re: Maritime mail 1874
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2013, 04:20:32 PM »
I've now heard from an expert on British rates from this era. His answer is:

The British rate to Mexico by British packet was reduced to 1/- single by Treasury Warrant dated 1 April 1863. This had to be prepaid, and was subject to a local charge on arrival in Mexico. Post Office Guides for Jan 1865 Jan 1868 Jan 1871 and Jan 1874 all show the same rate by any route (Br or Fr packet or via USA). Your cover is therefore prepaid for the over half and under 1 ounce rate.

British packets to West Indies can be found in Kenton & Parsons. In case you do not have this your cover left Southampton on 2 Feb 1874 by the Royal Mail SPCo ss Elbe, and arrived at St Thomas on 16 Feb. There it was trans-shipped to the Eider, leaving on 17 Feb and arriving Vera Cruz on 25 Feb 1874.

Bob Watson

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Re: Maritime mail 1874
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2013, 08:26:57 PM »
Mark
Many thanks for the reference (but I believe it should be April 2005).
Regards,
Bob

Mark Banchik

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Re: Maritime mail 1874
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2013, 03:33:01 PM »
Cover carried on Royal Mail Steam Packet (RMSP) 'Eider' arriving Vera Cruz 25 Feb. 1872, departing 27 Feb. for Tampico. See MEXICANA, July 2005 for complete RMSP sailings between 1842 and 1879.2/- was British packet rate to port (Vera Cruz), '3' should equal ~37c Mexican inland postage for a 1/2-3/4 oz letter, second distance (>16 leagues) step from Vera Cruz to Mexico City.
Hope this helps.Mark

Bob Watson

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Maritime mail 1874
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2013, 09:17:21 PM »
I have a cover ex London postmarked Lombard Street 31 Jan 1874 and arriving at Vera Cruz 27 Feb 1874 on its way to Mexico [City]. Can anyone help with the route and the ship that carried it?
 
Also, it was marked "2/-" in red and "3" in black. I take the first to be 2 shillings prepaid and the second 3 reales due. I think the 2 shillings was for double the ½ ounce packet rate as far as the port of entry. The 3 reales, of course, was the Mexican charge. Was that also a double rate? Or was there a difference in weight steps between British and  metric measures?
Regards from an infrequent contributor,
Bob